Could this be a comeback?

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This morning, I posted the following thought on Facebook: “I think I am going to start blogging again. And with that mention – my stomach became filled with butterflies.”

Could this be a blogging comeback for me? Is it possible that I will dust off the cobwebs of my blog, open the curtains, and once again let the world read my words? Do I even have words worth reading?

These are all questions I am asking myself, because I miss writing. I could write and not “publish” my words; but what is the fun of writing, if the words you write are not read? And that question leads me to the real reason I stopped writing: reading.

I’m not a reader. I’m sorry, but it is true.

I stepped back from the blogosphere, because I grew tired of the obligation that exists between bloggers. To be read – you need to read. To be read more – you need to read and comment. The more you are read – the more you have to read. The more the more the more… Argh! Thank goodness I was never Freshly Pressed. *shudder*

So, will I write? Yes, I will write. Will I read and comment? Maybe.

Below is the letter I sent to friends and family for Christmas. Based on my Christmas letter, I’m not surprised I am back in the blogosphere.

::

Season’s Greetings!

This Christmas letter is the most fluid letter I’ve attempted to write. I cannot tell you the number of drafts I’ve generated, never fully satisfied with the “finished” product. At the last minute, I decided to share an additional picture with all of you, which changed the letter entirely.

This is not a Christmas letter but a story of sorts. Please excuse the length.

.:.

In February 2013, my Uncle D died. Uncle D is my Mom’s younger brother, and he battled Alzheimer’s for a number of years. We were thankful to spend the summer with him at the Shore in 2012. At the time, he didn’t really know me, but I knew him – and for the living, that’s what matters, and I made the most of it.

His memorial service was heart-wrenching and beautiful. The room was filled with laughter, tears, and love. My Mom’s family is a good group of people. I truly treasure time with the family. A piece of our puzzle is missing now, but we will work to keep the bond strong.

.:.

For the past 5 years, our Christmas tradition has included visiting (typically more than once) Santa and Mrs. Claus, who live approximately 5 miles from our house. And, for over 17 years from Thanksgiving until Christmas Eve, Santa and Mrs. Claus have opened their house to anyone and everyone. Their house is decorated to the hilt inside and outside. Mrs. Claus sits in the main house greeting everyone with a welcoming smile, while Santa sits outside the house in his own Santa shed.

From 6pm until 9pm daily, hundreds of families visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus. The line to visit with Santa is typically long and moves slowly, because Santa treats every visitor as if s/he is his only guest. He will spend as much time as the family or child needs, and he is always ready to smile for the camera – regardless of how many cameras are used.

Santa and Mrs. Claus are by no means fancy folk. Their house is a small two bedroom, one bath home, and it sits on a few acres of land, which is covered with a garden in the summer and lights in the winter. When you drive by their house during the off-season, you often catch a glimpse of Santa (always donning a red shirt) working in the garden. Based on their pantry, it is safe to assume Mrs. Claus spends her days canning the “fruits” of their gardens.  They are – like my family – good people.

This year, our trip to visit Santa was decided at the last minute, and we left our house later than usual. As a result, the line to visit with Santa was very long. When we entered Santa’s shed it was nearing 9pm. While still three families away from Santa’s big red chair, I noticed Mrs. Claus walk through the side door.

I was delighted! What a wonderful opportunity! We would get to sit with both Santa and Mrs. Claus. We’d already visited with Mrs. Claus and taken a picture with her, so this was a bonus! When I looked at my watch and saw it was after 9pm, I realized Mrs. Claus had “closed” the house and could join Santa.

Eventually, we made it up to Santa and Mrs. Claus, and we made the most of the time. I was glowing the rest of the night. In the 5yrs of visiting, we’d never timed it so perfectly. The moment was amazing. Even better – we were able to capture the moment with the perfect picture. When I got home, I posted the picture on Facebook, and I went on and on about how perfect it all was.

Two days later, I learned that this was going to be the last year Santa and Mrs. Claus were opening their house to visitors. I learned that Mrs. Claus is battling Alzheimer’s, and Mrs. Claus’ illness makes it too difficult for Santa to keep the tradition going.

Aunt M let us know that 2012 was going to be the last year she was going to travel with Uncle D to the Shore, because his illness was making it increasingly difficult for him to travel, etc. We spent time with Uncle D, knowing it was going to be the last time we were with him at the Shore, and we made the most of it.

Well, we didn’t know the time with Santa and Mrs. Claus would be our last, but we sure made the most of it. We milked it for all it was worth. I am so glad we went – that day and that time. It was wonderful. It was perfect. The memory will be with me as long as my mind is with me.

You never know when… so make sure you milk the good stuff. Milk the good stuff for all it’s worth, knowing the worth of those moments – the good stuff – is priceless.

Here’s to 2014. May the New Year be filled with the good stuff. And remember – milk it!

Visiting Santa Dec 2013 (22)

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33 thoughts on “Could this be a comeback?

  1. It seems like so many things were happening around you, when you were away from blogging. It’s always a pleasure to read your posts.
    Wishing you and your family a happy and prosperous new year!!

    • Thank you, Arindam. There has certainly been a great deal going on in my absence. The new year is starting off at a welcomed slower pace.
      Wishing you a happy and healthy new year, too. Thank you again for visiting.

  2. Well welcome back, Lenore!!! Great to read your year in recap and yes—milk it for all it is worth. If I have realized anything this year it is that you don’t know what tomorrow will bring so live each moment as you want to remember it. Sounds simplistic but it is so true. Welcome back—you have been missed!

    • Isn’t it funny how the simplest bits of wisdom is the best wisdom? Thank you for the welcome back. Here’s to seeing you again. I am glad you are active on Facebook. I love seeing your growing teapot collection, as well as your curious cats.

    • Thank you, Deborah. I appreciate you visiting. And, congrats to you on your marriage and pregnancy. I’ve been “watching” you via Facebook. I hope you’ll pop in again from time to time. It’s the way I stay in touch – even if I don’t say “hello”. I will work on saying “hello” though. Promise.

    • Oh Georgette. I’ve missed my friends within the blogosphere. I am so glad you are here to welcome me back. Thank you. I’ve missed your family stories, even if I didn’t read every single one. (smile) I hope your family is doing well.

    • Thanks Lisa. I sincerely appreciate your comment. Means a great deal. Funny thing… I don’t remember sending you the card, though. I thought I held off, because you were going out of town. I meant to send it at the first of the year. Did I? Clearly my mind is a tarp as a shack! (smile)

  3. Lenore! Oh Lenore, it’s so good to see you around again! I’ve missed you and like you, I’ve also missed writing. Perhaps 2014 is a good year for a comeback, even if you’re just checking in with us all once in a while 🙂 In the meantime, let’s work on milking!

    • What do you mean start writing again? Leonore, you wrote every day last year! Your photo project was excellent!

      Yes, I did visit you, but I came and went silently. You did such a brilliant job. Congrats to you. (And, thanks for your kind words. It is good to “chat” with you again.)

  4. Lenore, I absolutely loved this piece. You brought me to tears. For me, 2013 was a year that began with processing my mother’s recent death, then eulogizing her, emptying and selling our family home, and breaking my foot (necessitating surgery). It was hard to write when my every waking moment during the summer and a lot of the fall was spent in physical pain. But I’m getting back into the swing of it.

    Reading this post reminds me of what an eloquent writer you are, and that if you choose to bless us with your words, I’ll certainly enjoy reading them. You absolutely do not have to read my blog, just keep putting your words out here for us to read.

  5. Oh yeah! You’re back! I know…the reading part…it’s really difficult. I feel it cuts into so many other important parts of my life. But also, I have gained so much in my blogging escapades that I now can hardly imagine life w/o WP. At least there’s that “like” button, which can speed up the feedback process. We simply can’t read & respond to everything.

    How cool that it worked out for you to have such a special visit with Mr. & Mrs. Claus. Isn’t it eery how things like that sometimes happen?
    Good to see you back here, Lenore.

    • Hi Linda! I am so glad I still see you via Twitter. I hope to write once a week, and I will try to read on weekends.

      I miss these old stomping grounds. And, that night in December was a big enough spark to get me back to writing. Glad you liked it.

  6. The transition from doing an activity for fun and doing one out of obligation, which essentially strips all the fun out of it is never good. I don’t think people should feel required to post-read-comment-like because this is a voluntary leisure time activity. I’m always happy when people stop by and comment — I’d hate to think it’s because they HAD to.

    I’ve been writing less because my free time’s been eaten up with both useful things like work and other bright shiny objects like WWF, but I’m going to make the attempt to balance the latter out a little more with writing. I find that I miss it.

    • I am forever grateful for the other bright shiny things, because it has kept me connected with you and Amy.

      I hope you do write again. I will more than likely read your words because I want to read your words. I miss writing, too; and, I am glad I miss writing, if that makes sense.

    • I’m further behind than you, Oma. And what – pray tell – is this bearded man staring at me via your Avatar? It sure looks like you wear retirement well, my friend.
      I’m still working on the writing – when, what, etc. Baby steps.

  7. This made me cry … I just lost my sister to a combination of alzheimer’s and lung cancer on December 19, 2013. If you are so inclined, I wrote about our last week together in a blog called “Words Fail”. Thanks for reiterating what I have experienced so vividly over the past 6 months – it’s important to milk it! God bless!

    • Judah, my apologies for getting back to you so late. I lost my father to lung-cancer, so I can – sadly – relate to you on two levels. My heart goes out to you. I am glad my words touched you. And, I will read your post – feeling no pressure to do so. 🙂 Thank you for taking the time to visit, read, and comment. I do appreciate it.

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